The Heritage Hotel opened in 1910. The hotel was advertised as “fireproof, noise proof, and dustproof during its opening. The hotel’s intersection includes other great historical landmarks such as the Tennessee State Capitol, and the Ryman…

The first African-American public primary school in Nashville was built on this site (then 217 S. Summer St) in 1893. The Pearl School was named for the first superintendent of Nashville schools, Joshua F. Pearl. The new building was the pride of…

In March 1920, Washington became the 35th state to pass the 19th amendment, which secured women the right to vote. Only one more state was needed to ratify the amendment. Four months later, Tennessee Governor Albert Roberts called special sessions…

This site was once the family home of Felix Kirk Zollicoffer. Born in Maury County in 1812, he became a printer, and worked with newspapers in various areas in Tennessee and in Huntsville, Alabama. He began a military career as a lieutenant in the…

In 1919, the Tennessee General Assembly passed the Tennessee Memorial Act, which established plans to build a memorial for veterans of the First World War that could also be used for state office space and public gatherings. Also in the plan were…